/page/2
Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao 
the dancing behemoth, met with hysteria nothing less of a mystic visitation. It represents accomplishment in its own right, but doesn’t qualify as the summary statement on the relations of society, form and modernization at the end of a great modern century.
Compares Bilbao Guggenheim to Gehry’s earlier Disney Concert Hall and to Frank Lloyd Wright’s New York Guggenheim Museum
- Kwinter believes the Bilbao museum replaces the earlier promise of the Disney Concert Hall, but that both are not nearly as innovative or radical as Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim, which was the “kind of innovation not attempted often in this generation”
Philip Johnson thinks this building is a big deal

Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao 

the dancing behemoth, met with hysteria nothing less of a mystic visitation. It represents accomplishment in its own right, but doesn’t qualify as the summary statement on the relations of society, form and modernization at the end of a great modern century.

Compares Bilbao Guggenheim to Gehry’s earlier Disney Concert Hall and to Frank Lloyd Wright’s New York Guggenheim Museum

- Kwinter believes the Bilbao museum replaces the earlier promise of the Disney Concert Hall, but that both are not nearly as innovative or radical as Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim, which was the “kind of innovation not attempted often in this generation”

Philip Johnson thinks this building is a big deal

 
Mosque of Córdoba

 Independent elements are combined additively to form an indeterminate whole. And the local syntax is fixed but there is no overarching geometric scaffolding. Parts are not fragments of whole, but simply parts. Lastly, the possibility of incremental growth is anticipated in the mathematical relations of the parts. Transformation over time- each stage is a replication of the previous. 
Alluded to by Stan Allen.

Mosque of Córdoba

 Independent elements are combined additively to form an indeterminate whole. And the local syntax is fixed but there is no overarching geometric scaffolding. Parts are not fragments of whole, but simply parts. Lastly, the possibility of incremental growth is anticipated in the mathematical relations of the parts. Transformation over time- each stage is a replication of the previous. 

Alluded to by Stan Allen.

Open Field vs Closed Field

Open Field- An essential impediment to total politics; it is driven by the complexity and competition of its parts. The domain of enlightened traditionalism (Popper). “Open as an idea and closed as a fact.”

 

 vs

 

Closed Field - The domain of utopia and of the bricoleur. Due to thecomplexities of modern society, the closed field rarely materializes.

Peter Eisenman
Cornell (B.Arch) and Columbia (Master of Science in Architecture), and Cambridge (M.A. and Ph.D.), is part of the New York Five (more social and academic allegiances than anything) He respects Derrida and collaborated with him at Park de la Villette 1982 competition. A ssociated with Deconstructivism.
 
 
Writings include 
Houses of Cards. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987. 
Diagram Diaries (Universe Architecture Series), Thames and Hudson, 1999. 
Blurred Zones: Investigations of the Interstitial : Eisenman Architects 1988-1998 
Giuseppe Terragni: Transformations, Decompositions, Critiques, New York, The Monacelli Press 2003
Eisenman Inside Out. Selected Writings 1963-1988, New Haven-London, Yale University Press 2004 
Ten Canonical Buildings 1950-2000, New York, Rizzoli International Publications inc. 2008 

Peter Eisenman

Cornell (B.Arch) and Columbia (Master of Science in Architecture), and Cambridge (M.A. and Ph.D.), is part of the New York Five (more social and academic allegiances than anything) He respects Derrida and collaborated with him at Park de la Villette 1982 competition. A ssociated with Deconstructivism.

 

Writings include

Houses of Cards. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987.

Diagram Diaries (Universe Architecture Series), Thames and Hudson, 1999.

Blurred Zones: Investigations of the Interstitial : Eisenman Architects 1988-1998 

Giuseppe Terragni: Transformations, Decompositions, Critiques, New York, The Monacelli Press 2003

Eisenman Inside Out. Selected Writings 1963-1988, New Haven-London, Yale University Press 2004 

Ten Canonical Buildings 1950-2000, New York, Rizzoli International Publications inc. 2008 

Jacques Derrida
Cited in Mark Wigley’s text,  Derrida (1930-2004) A French-Jewish philosopher founded the critical theory- ‘deconstruction’. Derrida challenged the fundamental privilege of a unify principle, and suggested the notion of multiplicity and identity. “Deconstruction” is a “translation” of two of Heidegger’s terms: Destruction, meaning “not a destruction but precisely a destructuring that dismantles the structural layers in the system,” and Abbau, meaning “to take apart an edifice in order to see how it is constituted or deconstituted.” Derrida follows Heidegger’s argument that this “destructuring” or “unbuilding” disturbs a tradition by inhabiting its structure in a way that exploits its metaphoric resources against itself.

Jacques Derrida

Cited in Mark Wigley’s text,  Derrida (1930-2004) A French-Jewish philosopher founded the critical theory- ‘deconstruction’. Derrida challenged the fundamental privilege of a unify principle, and suggested the notion of multiplicity and identity. “Deconstruction” is a “translation” of two of Heidegger’s terms: Destruction, meaning “not a destruction but precisely a destructuring that dismantles the structural layers in the system,” and Abbau, meaning “to take apart an edifice in order to see how it is constituted or deconstituted.” Derrida follows Heidegger’s argument that this “destructuring” or “unbuilding” disturbs a tradition by inhabiting its structure in a way that exploits its metaphoric resources against itself.

Martin Heidegger
(1889 to 1976) who was an influential German philosopher known for his existential and phenomenological explorations of the ‘question of Being’, agreed with Kant that laying the foundations is the necessary task of all metaphysics. He also used architecture as metaphor to display his idea about the relationship between edifice and foundation. In his reading, edifice and foundation are not simply two separate parts. ‘Edifice’ is not an addition to the foundation; rather, it reveals the foundation. The edifice and its structure is a representation of the foundation. So you can see in this diagram. The change in foundation is reflected in the change in the form of the edifice. Thus the restriction imposed on the foundation, is the restriction that restrict free form of representation of the tower.

Martin Heidegger

(1889 to 1976) who was an influential German philosopher known for his existential and phenomenological explorations of the ‘question of Being’, agreed with Kant that laying the foundations is the necessary task of all metaphysics. He also used architecture as metaphor to display his idea about the relationship between edifice and foundation. In his reading, edifice and foundation are not simply two separate parts. ‘Edifice’ is not an addition to the foundation; rather, it reveals the foundation. The edifice and its structure is a representation of the foundation. So you can see in this diagram. The change in foundation is reflected in the change in the form of the edifice. Thus the restriction imposed on the foundation, is the restriction that restrict free form of representation of the tower.

Sarah Whiting
BA Yale University, MArch Princeton, Ph.D from MIT. Dean of the Rice University School of Architecture. Has held teaching positions at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, the Princeton University School of Architecture, the Illinois Institute of Technology, the University of Kentucky and the University of Florida. Is a design principal of WW Architecture.
Writings include
Whiting, Sarah. “Superblockism: Chicago’s Elastic Grid,” Histories of Cities: Design and Context, eds. Rodolphe el-Khoury and Edward Robbins (London: Spon/Routledge, 2004): 57-76.
Whiting, Sarah. “Bas-Relief Urbanism: Chicago’s Figured Field,” in Phyllis Lambert, ed. Mies in America (CCA + Whitney Museum, 2001): 642-691.
Somol, R.E. and Whiting, Sarah. “Notes around the Doppler Effect and Other Moods of Modernism.” Perspecta 33 (2002): 72-77.
Koolhaas, Rem and Whiting, Sarah. “Spot Check: A Conversation between Rem Koolhaas and Sarah Whiting.” Assemblage, No. 40, 36-55. Dec., 1999.
Whiting, Sarah. “Bellyache”. Log 4, 5-8.
Whiting, Sarah. “Critical Reflections.” Assemblage, No. 41, 88-89. Apr., 2000

Sarah Whiting

BA Yale University, MArch Princeton, Ph.D from MIT. Dean of the Rice University School of Architecture. Has held teaching positions at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, the Princeton University School of Architecture, the Illinois Institute of Technology, the University of Kentucky and the University of Florida. Is a design principal of WW Architecture.

Writings include

  • Whiting, Sarah. “Superblockism: Chicago’s Elastic Grid,” Histories of Cities: Design and Context, eds. Rodolphe el-Khoury and Edward Robbins (London: Spon/Routledge, 2004): 57-76.
  • Whiting, Sarah. “Bas-Relief Urbanism: Chicago’s Figured Field,” in Phyllis Lambert, ed. Mies in America (CCA + Whitney Museum, 2001): 642-691.
  • Somol, R.E. and Whiting, Sarah. “Notes around the Doppler Effect and Other Moods of Modernism.” Perspecta 33 (2002): 72-77.
  • Koolhaas, Rem and Whiting, Sarah. “Spot Check: A Conversation between Rem Koolhaas and Sarah Whiting.” Assemblage, No. 40, 36-55. Dec., 1999.
  • Whiting, Sarah. “Bellyache”. Log 4, 5-8.
  • Whiting, Sarah. “Critical Reflections.” Assemblage, No. 41, 88-89. Apr., 2000
Mark Wigley
Received his Bachelor of Architecture and PhD from the University of Auckland, New Zealand. He Taught at Princeton University, from 1987 to 1999, where he also served as the director of Graduate Studies. Since 2004, he has been the Dean of the Graduate School of Architecture and Planning at Columbia University.
In 1988, Wigley co- curated an exhibition with Philip Johnson entitled “Deconstructivist Architecture” at the MoMA. The exhibition featured the works of seven architects, including Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, Peter Eisenman, Daniel Libeskind, Bernard Tschumi, Rem Koolhaas and Coop Himmelb(l)au. 
 
writings include:
 
"The Activist Drawing: Situationist Architectures From Constant’s New Babylon to Beyond" (2001).
Constant’s New Babylon: The Hyper-Architecture of Desire, Rotterdam, 010 Publishers, 1998.
White walls, Designer Dresses: The fashioning of modern architecture, Cambridge, Mass., MIT Press, 1995.
The Architecture of Deconstruction: Derrida’s Haunt, Cambridge, Mass., MIT Press, 1993.
(with Philip Johnson) Deconstructivist Architecture, MoMA, New York, Little, Brown/New York Graphic Society Books, 1988.
(edited with Catherine deZegher and Catherine de Zegher) The Activist Drawing: Retracing Situationist Architectures from Constant’s New Babylon to Beyond, Cambridge, Mass, MIT Press, 2001.

Mark Wigley

Received his Bachelor of Architecture and PhD from the University of Auckland, New Zealand. He Taught at Princeton University, from 1987 to 1999, where he also served as the director of Graduate Studies. Since 2004, he has been the Dean of the Graduate School of Architecture and Planning at Columbia University.

In 1988, Wigley co- curated an exhibition with Philip Johnson entitled “Deconstructivist Architecture” at the MoMA. The exhibition featured the works of seven architects, including Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, Peter Eisenman, Daniel Libeskind, Bernard Tschumi, Rem Koolhaas and Coop Himmelb(l)au.

 

writings include:

  • "The Activist Drawing: Situationist Architectures From Constant’s New Babylon to Beyond" (2001).
  • Constant’s New Babylon: The Hyper-Architecture of Desire, Rotterdam, 010 Publishers, 1998.
  • White walls, Designer Dresses: The fashioning of modern architecture, Cambridge, Mass., MIT Press, 1995.
  • The Architecture of Deconstruction: Derrida’s Haunt, Cambridge, Mass., MIT Press, 1993.
  • (with Philip Johnson) Deconstructivist Architecture, MoMA, New York, Little, Brown/New York Graphic Society Books, 1988.
  • (edited with Catherine deZegher and Catherine de Zegher) The Activist Drawing: Retracing Situationist Architectures from Constant’s New Babylon to Beyond, Cambridge, Mass, MIT Press, 2001.

Metaphysics.

Metaphysics is a branch of philosophy concerned with explaining the fundamental nature of being and the world.  The study of Being and existence- single unitary Being. That all things are derived from a single cause (or Arche- origin), Universal science: the study of first principles, changing forms and motion are illusory. The true underlying reality is that “all is one”. The world is harmonious, and is intelligible to rational understanding.

Zombie-Architect

architects tracing their predecessors’ footsteps unthinkingly or even instinctively.

Fredric Jameson 
 
BA Haverford College, PhD  Yale University American literary critic and Marxist political theorist. Professor at Duke University. He is best known for his analysis of contemporary cultural trends.
Recent writing include: 
A Singular Modernity: Essay on the Ontology of the Present. London & New York Verso. 2002. 
Archaeologies of the Future: The Desire Called Utopia and Other Science Fictions. London & New York: Verso. 2005. 
The Modernist Papers. London & New York Verso. 2007. 
Jameson on Jameson: Conversations on Cultural Marxism. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. 2007. 
The Ideologies of Theory. London & New York: Verso. 2009.  (One-volume edition, with additional essays)
Valences of the Dialectic. London & New York: Verso. 2009. 
The Hegel Variations: On the Phenomenology of Spirit. London & New York: Verso. 2010. 
Representing Capital: A Reading of Volume One. London & New York: Verso. 2011, forthcoming.

Fredric Jameson

BA Haverford College, PhD  Yale University American literary critic and Marxist political theorist. Professor at Duke University. He is best known for his analysis of contemporary cultural trends.

Recent writing include:

  • A Singular Modernity: Essay on the Ontology of the Present. London & New York Verso. 2002. 
  • Archaeologies of the Future: The Desire Called Utopia and Other Science Fictions. London & New York: Verso. 2005. 
  • The Modernist Papers. London & New York Verso. 2007. 
  • Jameson on Jameson: Conversations on Cultural Marxism. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. 2007. 
  • The Ideologies of Theory. London & New York: Verso. 2009.  (One-volume edition, with additional essays)
  • Valences of the Dialectic. London & New York: Verso. 2009. 
  • The Hegel Variations: On the Phenomenology of Spirit. London & New York: Verso. 2010. 
  • Representing Capital: A Reading of Volume One. London & New York: Verso. 2011, forthcoming.

Field Condition

A formal or spatial matrix capable of unifying diverse elements while respecting the identity as a whole.  And it localized  phenomena, defined by intricate confined connections, interval, repetition, and seriality. 

Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao 
the dancing behemoth, met with hysteria nothing less of a mystic visitation. It represents accomplishment in its own right, but doesn’t qualify as the summary statement on the relations of society, form and modernization at the end of a great modern century.
Compares Bilbao Guggenheim to Gehry’s earlier Disney Concert Hall and to Frank Lloyd Wright’s New York Guggenheim Museum
- Kwinter believes the Bilbao museum replaces the earlier promise of the Disney Concert Hall, but that both are not nearly as innovative or radical as Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim, which was the “kind of innovation not attempted often in this generation”
Philip Johnson thinks this building is a big deal

Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao 

the dancing behemoth, met with hysteria nothing less of a mystic visitation. It represents accomplishment in its own right, but doesn’t qualify as the summary statement on the relations of society, form and modernization at the end of a great modern century.

Compares Bilbao Guggenheim to Gehry’s earlier Disney Concert Hall and to Frank Lloyd Wright’s New York Guggenheim Museum

- Kwinter believes the Bilbao museum replaces the earlier promise of the Disney Concert Hall, but that both are not nearly as innovative or radical as Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim, which was the “kind of innovation not attempted often in this generation”

Philip Johnson thinks this building is a big deal

 
Mosque of Córdoba

 Independent elements are combined additively to form an indeterminate whole. And the local syntax is fixed but there is no overarching geometric scaffolding. Parts are not fragments of whole, but simply parts. Lastly, the possibility of incremental growth is anticipated in the mathematical relations of the parts. Transformation over time- each stage is a replication of the previous. 
Alluded to by Stan Allen.

Mosque of Córdoba

 Independent elements are combined additively to form an indeterminate whole. And the local syntax is fixed but there is no overarching geometric scaffolding. Parts are not fragments of whole, but simply parts. Lastly, the possibility of incremental growth is anticipated in the mathematical relations of the parts. Transformation over time- each stage is a replication of the previous. 

Alluded to by Stan Allen.

Open Field vs Closed Field

Open Field- An essential impediment to total politics; it is driven by the complexity and competition of its parts. The domain of enlightened traditionalism (Popper). “Open as an idea and closed as a fact.”

 

 vs

 

Closed Field - The domain of utopia and of the bricoleur. Due to thecomplexities of modern society, the closed field rarely materializes.

Peter Eisenman
Cornell (B.Arch) and Columbia (Master of Science in Architecture), and Cambridge (M.A. and Ph.D.), is part of the New York Five (more social and academic allegiances than anything) He respects Derrida and collaborated with him at Park de la Villette 1982 competition. A ssociated with Deconstructivism.
 
 
Writings include 
Houses of Cards. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987. 
Diagram Diaries (Universe Architecture Series), Thames and Hudson, 1999. 
Blurred Zones: Investigations of the Interstitial : Eisenman Architects 1988-1998 
Giuseppe Terragni: Transformations, Decompositions, Critiques, New York, The Monacelli Press 2003
Eisenman Inside Out. Selected Writings 1963-1988, New Haven-London, Yale University Press 2004 
Ten Canonical Buildings 1950-2000, New York, Rizzoli International Publications inc. 2008 

Peter Eisenman

Cornell (B.Arch) and Columbia (Master of Science in Architecture), and Cambridge (M.A. and Ph.D.), is part of the New York Five (more social and academic allegiances than anything) He respects Derrida and collaborated with him at Park de la Villette 1982 competition. A ssociated with Deconstructivism.

 

Writings include

Houses of Cards. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987.

Diagram Diaries (Universe Architecture Series), Thames and Hudson, 1999.

Blurred Zones: Investigations of the Interstitial : Eisenman Architects 1988-1998 

Giuseppe Terragni: Transformations, Decompositions, Critiques, New York, The Monacelli Press 2003

Eisenman Inside Out. Selected Writings 1963-1988, New Haven-London, Yale University Press 2004 

Ten Canonical Buildings 1950-2000, New York, Rizzoli International Publications inc. 2008 

Jacques Derrida
Cited in Mark Wigley’s text,  Derrida (1930-2004) A French-Jewish philosopher founded the critical theory- ‘deconstruction’. Derrida challenged the fundamental privilege of a unify principle, and suggested the notion of multiplicity and identity. “Deconstruction” is a “translation” of two of Heidegger’s terms: Destruction, meaning “not a destruction but precisely a destructuring that dismantles the structural layers in the system,” and Abbau, meaning “to take apart an edifice in order to see how it is constituted or deconstituted.” Derrida follows Heidegger’s argument that this “destructuring” or “unbuilding” disturbs a tradition by inhabiting its structure in a way that exploits its metaphoric resources against itself.

Jacques Derrida

Cited in Mark Wigley’s text,  Derrida (1930-2004) A French-Jewish philosopher founded the critical theory- ‘deconstruction’. Derrida challenged the fundamental privilege of a unify principle, and suggested the notion of multiplicity and identity. “Deconstruction” is a “translation” of two of Heidegger’s terms: Destruction, meaning “not a destruction but precisely a destructuring that dismantles the structural layers in the system,” and Abbau, meaning “to take apart an edifice in order to see how it is constituted or deconstituted.” Derrida follows Heidegger’s argument that this “destructuring” or “unbuilding” disturbs a tradition by inhabiting its structure in a way that exploits its metaphoric resources against itself.

Martin Heidegger
(1889 to 1976) who was an influential German philosopher known for his existential and phenomenological explorations of the ‘question of Being’, agreed with Kant that laying the foundations is the necessary task of all metaphysics. He also used architecture as metaphor to display his idea about the relationship between edifice and foundation. In his reading, edifice and foundation are not simply two separate parts. ‘Edifice’ is not an addition to the foundation; rather, it reveals the foundation. The edifice and its structure is a representation of the foundation. So you can see in this diagram. The change in foundation is reflected in the change in the form of the edifice. Thus the restriction imposed on the foundation, is the restriction that restrict free form of representation of the tower.

Martin Heidegger

(1889 to 1976) who was an influential German philosopher known for his existential and phenomenological explorations of the ‘question of Being’, agreed with Kant that laying the foundations is the necessary task of all metaphysics. He also used architecture as metaphor to display his idea about the relationship between edifice and foundation. In his reading, edifice and foundation are not simply two separate parts. ‘Edifice’ is not an addition to the foundation; rather, it reveals the foundation. The edifice and its structure is a representation of the foundation. So you can see in this diagram. The change in foundation is reflected in the change in the form of the edifice. Thus the restriction imposed on the foundation, is the restriction that restrict free form of representation of the tower.

Sarah Whiting
BA Yale University, MArch Princeton, Ph.D from MIT. Dean of the Rice University School of Architecture. Has held teaching positions at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, the Princeton University School of Architecture, the Illinois Institute of Technology, the University of Kentucky and the University of Florida. Is a design principal of WW Architecture.
Writings include
Whiting, Sarah. “Superblockism: Chicago’s Elastic Grid,” Histories of Cities: Design and Context, eds. Rodolphe el-Khoury and Edward Robbins (London: Spon/Routledge, 2004): 57-76.
Whiting, Sarah. “Bas-Relief Urbanism: Chicago’s Figured Field,” in Phyllis Lambert, ed. Mies in America (CCA + Whitney Museum, 2001): 642-691.
Somol, R.E. and Whiting, Sarah. “Notes around the Doppler Effect and Other Moods of Modernism.” Perspecta 33 (2002): 72-77.
Koolhaas, Rem and Whiting, Sarah. “Spot Check: A Conversation between Rem Koolhaas and Sarah Whiting.” Assemblage, No. 40, 36-55. Dec., 1999.
Whiting, Sarah. “Bellyache”. Log 4, 5-8.
Whiting, Sarah. “Critical Reflections.” Assemblage, No. 41, 88-89. Apr., 2000

Sarah Whiting

BA Yale University, MArch Princeton, Ph.D from MIT. Dean of the Rice University School of Architecture. Has held teaching positions at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, the Princeton University School of Architecture, the Illinois Institute of Technology, the University of Kentucky and the University of Florida. Is a design principal of WW Architecture.

Writings include

  • Whiting, Sarah. “Superblockism: Chicago’s Elastic Grid,” Histories of Cities: Design and Context, eds. Rodolphe el-Khoury and Edward Robbins (London: Spon/Routledge, 2004): 57-76.
  • Whiting, Sarah. “Bas-Relief Urbanism: Chicago’s Figured Field,” in Phyllis Lambert, ed. Mies in America (CCA + Whitney Museum, 2001): 642-691.
  • Somol, R.E. and Whiting, Sarah. “Notes around the Doppler Effect and Other Moods of Modernism.” Perspecta 33 (2002): 72-77.
  • Koolhaas, Rem and Whiting, Sarah. “Spot Check: A Conversation between Rem Koolhaas and Sarah Whiting.” Assemblage, No. 40, 36-55. Dec., 1999.
  • Whiting, Sarah. “Bellyache”. Log 4, 5-8.
  • Whiting, Sarah. “Critical Reflections.” Assemblage, No. 41, 88-89. Apr., 2000
Mark Wigley
Received his Bachelor of Architecture and PhD from the University of Auckland, New Zealand. He Taught at Princeton University, from 1987 to 1999, where he also served as the director of Graduate Studies. Since 2004, he has been the Dean of the Graduate School of Architecture and Planning at Columbia University.
In 1988, Wigley co- curated an exhibition with Philip Johnson entitled “Deconstructivist Architecture” at the MoMA. The exhibition featured the works of seven architects, including Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, Peter Eisenman, Daniel Libeskind, Bernard Tschumi, Rem Koolhaas and Coop Himmelb(l)au. 
 
writings include:
 
"The Activist Drawing: Situationist Architectures From Constant’s New Babylon to Beyond" (2001).
Constant’s New Babylon: The Hyper-Architecture of Desire, Rotterdam, 010 Publishers, 1998.
White walls, Designer Dresses: The fashioning of modern architecture, Cambridge, Mass., MIT Press, 1995.
The Architecture of Deconstruction: Derrida’s Haunt, Cambridge, Mass., MIT Press, 1993.
(with Philip Johnson) Deconstructivist Architecture, MoMA, New York, Little, Brown/New York Graphic Society Books, 1988.
(edited with Catherine deZegher and Catherine de Zegher) The Activist Drawing: Retracing Situationist Architectures from Constant’s New Babylon to Beyond, Cambridge, Mass, MIT Press, 2001.

Mark Wigley

Received his Bachelor of Architecture and PhD from the University of Auckland, New Zealand. He Taught at Princeton University, from 1987 to 1999, where he also served as the director of Graduate Studies. Since 2004, he has been the Dean of the Graduate School of Architecture and Planning at Columbia University.

In 1988, Wigley co- curated an exhibition with Philip Johnson entitled “Deconstructivist Architecture” at the MoMA. The exhibition featured the works of seven architects, including Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, Peter Eisenman, Daniel Libeskind, Bernard Tschumi, Rem Koolhaas and Coop Himmelb(l)au.

 

writings include:

  • "The Activist Drawing: Situationist Architectures From Constant’s New Babylon to Beyond" (2001).
  • Constant’s New Babylon: The Hyper-Architecture of Desire, Rotterdam, 010 Publishers, 1998.
  • White walls, Designer Dresses: The fashioning of modern architecture, Cambridge, Mass., MIT Press, 1995.
  • The Architecture of Deconstruction: Derrida’s Haunt, Cambridge, Mass., MIT Press, 1993.
  • (with Philip Johnson) Deconstructivist Architecture, MoMA, New York, Little, Brown/New York Graphic Society Books, 1988.
  • (edited with Catherine deZegher and Catherine de Zegher) The Activist Drawing: Retracing Situationist Architectures from Constant’s New Babylon to Beyond, Cambridge, Mass, MIT Press, 2001.

Metaphysics.

Metaphysics is a branch of philosophy concerned with explaining the fundamental nature of being and the world.  The study of Being and existence- single unitary Being. That all things are derived from a single cause (or Arche- origin), Universal science: the study of first principles, changing forms and motion are illusory. The true underlying reality is that “all is one”. The world is harmonious, and is intelligible to rational understanding.

Zombie-Architect

architects tracing their predecessors’ footsteps unthinkingly or even instinctively.

Fredric Jameson 
 
BA Haverford College, PhD  Yale University American literary critic and Marxist political theorist. Professor at Duke University. He is best known for his analysis of contemporary cultural trends.
Recent writing include: 
A Singular Modernity: Essay on the Ontology of the Present. London & New York Verso. 2002. 
Archaeologies of the Future: The Desire Called Utopia and Other Science Fictions. London & New York: Verso. 2005. 
The Modernist Papers. London & New York Verso. 2007. 
Jameson on Jameson: Conversations on Cultural Marxism. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. 2007. 
The Ideologies of Theory. London & New York: Verso. 2009.  (One-volume edition, with additional essays)
Valences of the Dialectic. London & New York: Verso. 2009. 
The Hegel Variations: On the Phenomenology of Spirit. London & New York: Verso. 2010. 
Representing Capital: A Reading of Volume One. London & New York: Verso. 2011, forthcoming.

Fredric Jameson

BA Haverford College, PhD  Yale University American literary critic and Marxist political theorist. Professor at Duke University. He is best known for his analysis of contemporary cultural trends.

Recent writing include:

  • A Singular Modernity: Essay on the Ontology of the Present. London & New York Verso. 2002. 
  • Archaeologies of the Future: The Desire Called Utopia and Other Science Fictions. London & New York: Verso. 2005. 
  • The Modernist Papers. London & New York Verso. 2007. 
  • Jameson on Jameson: Conversations on Cultural Marxism. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. 2007. 
  • The Ideologies of Theory. London & New York: Verso. 2009.  (One-volume edition, with additional essays)
  • Valences of the Dialectic. London & New York: Verso. 2009. 
  • The Hegel Variations: On the Phenomenology of Spirit. London & New York: Verso. 2010. 
  • Representing Capital: A Reading of Volume One. London & New York: Verso. 2011, forthcoming.

Field Condition

A formal or spatial matrix capable of unifying diverse elements while respecting the identity as a whole.  And it localized  phenomena, defined by intricate confined connections, interval, repetition, and seriality. 

Open Field vs Closed Field
Metaphysics.
Zombie-Architect
Field Condition

About:

An Architecture Theory Rolodex compiled from classmates presentations and readings throughout ARCH 5302. Use the links and tags to find containing cross-referenced entries for the architects, critics, buildings, titles and concepts that we have visited this semester.

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